"   You don’t have to be born beautiful to be wildly attractive.   "
Diana Vreeland  
"   Make your lives a masterpiece, you only get one canvas.   "
― E.A. Bucchianeri
"  

Rules of Style from Yohji Yamamoto

1. I believe that there are three conditions to a woman’s beauty. First, you must realize that not all women are beautiful all of the time. Sometimes beauty comes on a subconscious level. When she is in love, or has met someone new and exciting, she shines. Second, you must understand that life is unfair. Beauty is something that, for some, must be worked at. The third condition is luck. Some women can just be lucky.

2. My role in all of this is very simple. I make clothing like armor. My clothing protects you from unwelcome eyes.

3. Color, for me, has too many stories wrapped around it. I like black, white, gray, and navy. Like a uniform.

4. Life is better for beautiful people. You can become lucky if you are beautiful, you can become rich. But there is no truth in this definition of beauty.

5. If you feel strongly about someone, go up to them. Pursue what you want in life. Why be shy about something like that?

6. You can tell what a woman is going to be like in bed just by looking at her. There is a feeling about someone that comes from experience. When you’ve seen it once, you will recognize it again.

7. Fashion cannot make you sexy. Experience makes you sexy. Imagination makes people sexy. You have to train yourself, you have to study, and you have to live your life.

8. I love the back. A beautiful back makes a beautiful front. When you slouch, think about what happens to your front. You have to keep your back in the right position. This is where your spirit lies.

9. Men’s clothing is about tiny details, and I hate that. I am very small and I look stupid in a perfectly tailored suit. I want to be able to wear things that don’t fit perfectly, with the sleeves far too long. I wish clothing came with no sizes at all. It would be much better that way.

10. The biggest mistake you can make in fashion is imitation. If we keep on like this, fashion will die. There was a time when I used to fall in love on the street every day. I would see someone with such a way about them or such a flawless item that I would have to say, “Stop! Please! That’s perfect.” That never happens anymore. Everything is too similar. Soon it will be only a T-shirt and jeans.

11. I don’t think we should try to make space our own. I believe that as modern people we should live in mobility. We should always be moving.

  "
http://www.details.com/style-advice/rules-of-style/200510/japanese-designer-yahji-yamamoto-on-what-is-sexy-for-men
"   Don’t fear failure so much that you refuse to try new things. The saddest summary of a life contains three descriptions: could have, might have, and should have.   "
Unknown \
"   Smells are unlike any other memories. They remain with us fully 100% forever on some remote desert island of the mind where they keep the lowest profile. If they’re not shaken awake by something, they lay silent and still like sleeping dogs under the table. But once roused, they return as completely as the moment we first encountered them.   "
Jonathan Carroll 

flightcastiel:

why are there some lipsticks like $30 please calm down you glorified red crayon

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"   Don’t think about what can happen in a month. Don’t think about what can happen in a year. Just focus on the 24 hours in front of you and do what you can to get closer to where you want to be.   "
Eric Thomas
"   This is one more piece of advice I have for you: don’t get impatient. Even if things are so tangled up you can’t do anything, don’t get desperate or blow a fuse and start yanking on one particular thread before it’s ready to come undone. You have to figure it’s going to be a long process and that you’ll work on things slowly, one at a time.   "
Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood 
"   I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.   "
Jonathan Carroll
"   My grandfather always said that living is like licking honey off a thorn.   "
Louis Adamic
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"   When you are washing the dishes, washing the dishes must be the most important thing in your life. Just as when you are drinking tea, drinking tea must be the most important thing in your life. Drink your tea slowly and reverently, as if it is the axis on which the whole world revolves—slowly, evenly, without rushing toward the future. Live the actual moment. Only this actual moment is life.   "
Thich Nhat Hanh
"   For centuries, the myth of the lone genius has towered over us, its shadow obscuring the way creative work really gets done. The attempts to pick apart the Lennon-McCartney partnership reveal just how misleading that myth can be, because John and Paul were so obviously more creative as a pair than as individuals, even if at times they appeared to work in opposition to each other. The lone-genius myth prevents us from grappling with a series of paradoxes about creative pairs: that distance doesn’t impede intimacy, and is often a crucial ingredient of it; that competition and collaboration are often entwined. Only when we explore this terrain can we grasp how such pairs as Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, and Martin Luther King Jr. and Ralph Abernathy all managed to do such creative work. The essence of their achievements, it turns out, was relational. If that seems far-fetched, it’s because our cultural obsession with the individual has obscured the power of the creative pair.   "

Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of The Power of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs, explores the power of creative duos in an essay for The Atlantic. 

Complement with a brief history of the genius myth.

"   One of the true tasks of true friendship is to listen compassionately and creatively to the hidden silences. Often secrets are not revealed in words, they lie concealed in the silence between the words or in the depth of what is unsayable between two people.   "
John O’Donohue, Anam Cara